The Deason House

Built in 1845, the Deason home in Jones County, Mississippi stands as a Greek revival architectural gem from the antebellum era. As the oldest home in Ellisville, it was also the first painted home in the area and its detailed semi-octagonal vestibule is the only one of its kind known to exist in Mississippi, according to the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

“It’s one of the oldest structures completely made of longleaf pines in the world because longleaf is only indigenous to the Southeast United States,” said Frances Murphy, Regent of the Tallahala Chapter of the Daughters of the Revolution (DAR). “Studies have shown that the wood was likely cut in the 1830s and the [longleaf pines] are estimated to have been growing in the late 1300s.”

The first owners, Amos and Eleanor Deason, built the home as a farmhouse.

In 1890, Isaac Anderson, Jr. and wife Sarah Rebecca “Sallie” Pool purchased the home and lived there until 1939 when it went into the Anderson estate. In 1965, Mrs. Frances Anderson Smith, a descendant of both Amos Deason and Isaac Anderson, Jr., bought the home and in 1991 presented it to the Tallahala Chapter.

“Actually a lot of the Chapter members are family or descendants of the Anderson family, so I guess you could say it’s still owned by the same family,” said Frances.

Oh, and by the way…it’s haunted.

“The claim to fame the home is most notoriously known for is that Major Amos McLemore, Confederate Army officer was shot and killed in the home during the Civil War by Newton Knight,” said Frances.

Newton Knight had deserted the Confederate Army because of the 20-slave law, which stated that a man owning 20 slaves or more didn’t have to fight. Knight, who had never owned a slave, felt the Civil War had become a “rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight.” Jones County, being mostly wooded country, wasn’t a good place to raise cotton and therefore very few slaves lived there as compared to the rest of the state, Frances explained. Other soldiers with the same sentiments deserted the Confederacy along with Knight. Major Amos McLemore, who was from the area, headed up the troops sent to round up these deserters.

“Newton and his men could have stormed the house and killed everybody, but Newton specifically targeted McLemore,” said Frances. Everyone accepts that Newton Knight killed Amos McLemore even though there was no eye witness to the crime and Newton was never charged. “From this event, the house got the reputation of being haunted.”

Every year, the Saturday before Halloween, the Deason Home hosts a reenactment of the McLemore shooting, with the assistance of the Rosin Heel Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

“They are dressed in Civil War Army uniforms and they sit around the campfire outside,” said Frances, adding that the ladies are dressed in the period costumes. When guests touring the home enter the bedroom where Major McLemore was shot, McLemore is waiting for them. “As he talks to the guests. the door flies open and Newton Knight rushes in. So guests get a little taste of what it was like when the shooting took place.”

The reenactment event, which has been going on for 20 years, is family friendly, said Frances, although it may be a little startling when the gun goes off.

“But nothing gory.”

Frances encourages parents to make the tour a family event because children experience what life was like during the war while learning about the oldest home in Jones County.

“It’s not your traditional Halloween spook house by any stretch of the imagination.”

The house will also be open Halloween night, but rather than a reenactment, the night will be a Ghost Tour with past residents of the house telling their stories.

After all, some stories never die…and some characters refuse to.

 

For information on special events, tours, cost, and space rental, visit the website: http://www.deasonhome.org/

photo courtesy of  The Deason House

Build A Village…and They will Come

Thomas Landrum of Laurel, Mississippi didn’t set out to build a village.  It just…happened.

The village started as a business of handcrafted pine furniture, which has now been in business for over 33 years, explained Deborah (Landrum) Upton.

“My dad said the grandchildren didn’t appreciate how the people used to live and how their ancestors lived, worked and built their homes.”

Tom Landrum took the kids into the woods where they logged the trees and had a portable sawmill come in cut the wood into boards. This family project started in 2003.

“There was no master plan,” said Deborah.  “We started the first cabin. As soon as we got the cabin built we filled it with old things.” 

Today, that one cabin is one of 70 buildings located in the beautifully landscaped Landrum’s Homestead & Village located off Highway 15 in Laurel. With exhibits, wagon rides, gem mining, nature trails, a Confederate soldier encampment, an Old West Shooting Gallery, and a Native American Village, every visitor steps back into the late 1800s. In addition, through a partnership with the USDA Forest Service and the Mississippi Forestry Commission, the Landrums created an educational display on the Civilian Conservation Corps and South Mississippi’s reforestation history to show the importance of preservation and conservation. Biscuits are cooked on an old wood stove and there is a nature trail and a small lake with a pier where people can feed the catfish.  You can also play horseshoes and basketball.

 

“We do all kinds of groups and see a lot of families,” said Deborah. “Kids who come say it is their fifth time here.  We have families that come on a regular basis because they can bring a picnic lunch or tour.  They go at their own pace.  Nobody is rushing you through.”

Deborah grew up as the oldest of five children and during their travels, they always used the back roads, never the interstates.  Plus, they camped in a tent.

“Dad and Mom were always into history and preserving history,” said Deborah. “Dad always said that’s where you see things on the back roads.”

In today’s world of technology, a place like Landrum’s Homestead & Village is important to children. We don’t have conversations anymore, said Deborah. “What we’ve found is that when kids come here on a trip they can feel and see things and experience things they can’t get from a computer.”

The Landrum family always has a project going, but the one thing Deborah hopes people take home with them is a sense of family.

“This is my mom’s family land,” said Deborah. “We have a connection to the land. But when kids and other families are here, you see they are connected as well.”

At Landrum’s Homestead & Village, you hear and share stories of what was, but leave with a sense of heritage and an understanding of why heritage will always be important to future generations.

 

Website: http://landrums.com/

Open year round Monday – Saturday from 9 – 5

Walk-ins welcome!

 

Photos courtesy of Landrum’s Homestead & Village 

Originally published in Parents & Kids Magazine and Brad Smith

Pets on Vacation

Vacations are meant for everyone in the family, including the pet.

But wanting your pet to be a part and being able to include your pet are two different things. A “pet friendly” vacation involves a lot of preparation and preparation takes time. You’ll not only have to stay in a pet friendly environment, but you’ll need to know all the rules beforehand so no surprises crop up once you get there.

Trips that require flying are more complicated.

In fact, the ASPCA doesn’t recommend flying with pets because of the stress it causes. Some airlines allow smaller animals in the cabin if the crate fits under the seat, but not all our furry friends are small. So if your vacation requires flying and you can’t bear to leave your pet behind, consider these ASPCA tips:

  1. Check different airlines for guidelines on pet travel. Choose the one that works best for the safety of your pet and your peace of mind, even if you pay a little more.
  2. Your pet must have proper identification for air travel. The ASPCA recommends a microchip for identification and a collar and ID tag that includes the trip destination. 
  3. Secure your pet’s health certificate from the vet dated no more than ten days prior to take off. If vacationing outside the continental United States, obtain animal health care requirements from the foreign office of your travel destination.
  4. Use a USDA-approved shipping crate that allows your pet sitting, standing, lying down and turning around space. Line the crate with bedding. On the top and on the side of the crate, clearly label in large print “Live Animal.” Tape a photo of yourself on the carrier and legibly provide your name, address and telephone number, your pet’s destination point, and who will pick him up. With arrows, indicate the crate’s upright position. Also, carry with you a recent photograph of your pet.
  5. Placing a dish of frozen water into the crate before loading it onto the plane assures that your pet has access to water while in flight. Tape a pouch of dried food outside the crate so airline personnel can feed your pet during long-distance flights and layovers.
  6. The ASPCA does not recommend tranquilizing your pet because medication often hinders normal breathing. If you feel your pet needs tranquilizing, ask your veterinarian for the pros and cons.
  7. Direct flights decrease the chances of your pet being misplaced or mishandled by baggage personnel. Again, the extra cost is worth it.

At the vacation destination, the fun begins, but the safety doesn’t end.

Be mindful of these tips before taking your pet sightseeing in a car:

  1. Before vacation, try to take your pet on short rides in the family car and work up to extended trips.

  2. Pets should travel on an empty stomach to keep from getting carsick. Still, keep fresh water on hand so they stay hydrated.

  3. The car and the crate, if using one, should be well-ventilated at all times.

  4. Pets should not ride in the back of an open truck or with their head out the window. Flying objects cause serious damage to the eye.

  5. Stop occasionally so your pet can potty and exercise.

  6. Never leave your pet in a closed up vehicle or in the vehicle alone.

 

A well-planned vacation is a joy to everyone. Months and even years later, when you share photos with friends and family, in the middle of all the excitement will be one happy pet!  

By Richelle Putnam

GOOD SITES FOR ADVICE ON TRAVELING WITH PETS:

https://www.avma.org

http://www.aspca.org/

http://www.akc.org/public_education/travel_tips.cfm 

http://takeyourpet.com/

http://www.aaa.com/petbook/

 

 

Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest

Since the first Hwy 80 Songwriters fest in 2013,

which was made possible in part by an AT&T grant, the purpose and mission of the Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest were to expand the songwriter’s platform and territory, provide education in the songwriting craft for songwriters of all ages and levels of expertise, to build and support the creative economy in West Alabama and East Mississippi and to ignite the public’s understanding and appreciation for songwriters and their craft. Venues this year have included City Hall lawn, Demopolis, AL, Hal & Mal’s Restaurant and the Arts Center of Mississippi in Jackson. Now, the Montgomery Institute invites you to enjoy the Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest in Meridian from July 28-30, 2016.

The Fest, through The Montgomery Institute,

was awarded a $4,100.00 from the Mississippi Arts Commission (MAC). This grant is a portion of the $1.5 million in grants the commission will award in the 2016-2017 and will be used for the 2016 Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest. The grants are made possible by continued funding from the Mississippi State Legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Organizations that support the arts play a pivotal role in growing Mississippi’s creative economy,” said Malcolm White, Executive Director of MAC. “The Mississippi Arts Commission is pleased to support their work, which reinforces the value of the arts for communities and for the economic development of our state.”

The Mississippi Arts Commission, a state agency,

serves the residents of the state by providing grants that support programs to enhance communities; assist artists and arts organizations; promote the arts in education and celebrate Mississippi’s cultural heritage. Established in 1968, the Mississippi Arts Commission is funded by the Mississippi Legislature, the national Endowment for the Arts, the Mississippi Endowment for the Arts at the Community foundation of Greater Jackson and other private sources.  The agency serves as an active supporter and promoter of arts in community life and in arts education.

The mission of The Montgomery Institute

is to “upbuild the people and places of the East Mississippi and West Alabama region guided by the leadership legacy of G. V. ‘Sonny’ Montgomery.”  To accomplish its mission, TMI has undertaken initiatives in leadership development, rural place building, educational enhancement, workforce development, research and information dissemination, regional cooperation, and innovation.

On July 28, Squealer’s Restaurant and News Restaurant

in North Meridian welcome local and regional songwriters and with rounds beginning at 6:30 pm. On July 29, in downtown Meridian at 7 pm, Weidmann’s Restaurant, The Brickhaus Brewtique and The Echo Downtown welcome nine Mississippi/Alabama songwriters from outside the region. No matter what venue you choose, before the night is over, audiences will hear every songwriter come through their venue.  See the Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest Facebook page for more details.

On July 30 at noon, the historical Soule Feed Steamworks

welcomes Tricia Walker, Grammy Award winning songwriter, Director of Delta Music Institute and a MAC Roster Artist, who will facilitate the pro songwriting workshop. At 2:30 pm Shawna P (Pierce), a finalist in The Voice, whose mentor was Shakira, will facilitate a vocal performance workshop for all ages interested in singing and performing. ShawnaP facilitates these vocal workshops all over Alabama, from Muscle Shoals to the FloraBama. At 4:45 pm, the Open-Mic session begins, which is open to all ages and levels. The Grand Finale begins at 7 pm with Tricia Walker, ShawnaP and MAC Roster Artist, three-time Blues Award Winner and eleven-time Blues nominee Eden Brent.

The Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest would not be possible without grant awards from The Meridian Council for the Arts, Community Foundation of East Mississippi, and the Mississippi Arts Commission. Financial sponsors include Mitchell Distributing, Structural Steel Services, Mississippi Main Street and Mississippi Writers Guild. In-kind support comes from Kabana Productions, Soule Steam Feed Works and Mississippi Public Broadcasting and Supertalk Meridian 103.3. Media support includes The Radio People, WMOX, WTOK, The Meridian Star, The Meridian Family of Stations, The Eagle. Other support includes the City Meridian, Lauderdale County, East Mississippi and West Alabama and the communities therein.

Please check the Hwy 80 Songwriters Fest Facebook page for more details or call 601/880-1089

 

 

GRAMMY MUSEUM® MISSISSIPPI

 Mac McAnally, The Williams Brothers, Sonny Landreth, And Muddy Magnolias To Perform March 5 at Bologna Performing Arts Center

CLEVELAND, MISS. (FEB. 27, 2016)  – Following the opening of GRAMMY Museum® Mississippi on Saturday, March 5, a benefit concert will be held that evening at Delta State University’s Bologna Performing Arts Center, headlined by eight-time CMA Musician of the Year recipient Mac McAnally and multiple GRAMMY® Award nominees The Williams Brothers. Also set to perform are Mississippi-born slide guitarist Sonny Landreth and friends, and rising female soul rock duo Muddy Magnolias. Titled “Back Where I Come From,” the concert will explore these artists’ Mississippi ties through a special evening of music and conversation.

“We couldn’t think of a better way to pay respect to the people who have brought us so much enjoyment through their music than to have them perform during this exciting weekend,” said Lucy Janoush, President of the Cleveland Music Foundation. “There will also be special guests in attendance who will be recognized for their lasting contributions to the music we all love.”

“As native Mississippians, we are truly honored to be a part of this grand opening,” said The Williams Brothers’ Doug Williams. “The heritage of gospel music has very deep roots here in Mississippi and many gospel greats came from this state. We would like to personally thank the GRAMMY Museum for recognizing the rich musical heritage of this state, and for opening only the second museum of this nature here on these grounds.

Doug Williams’ brother Melvin added, “There are artists that put a stamp on my heart and soul so deep ‘til this day, it still remains relevant after all these years, especially ones with Mississippi roots like Aretha Franklin, The Staple Singers, Bo Diddley, Sam Cooke, and my dad, Leon “Pop” Williams, and the legendary Jackson Southernaires. Me being a country boy born and raised in Mississippi singing gospel music from the cottons fields to being recognized as part of such an historic event as the GRAMMY Museum Mississippi grand opening is priceless. I feel like Mississippi has been honored with a Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award, and The Williams Brothers are part of the presenters.”

“Back Where I Come From” will take place on March 5 at 7:30 p.m. at Bologna Performing Arts Center on the campus of Delta State University, 1003 West Sunflower Road, Cleveland, Miss.  Tickets range in price from $50-$100 and can be purchased by the general public beginning Wednesday, March 2, by calling Bologna Performing Arts Center at 662-846-4626. For a full schedule of GRAMMY Museum Mississippi grand opening events, visit www.grammymuseumms.org.

Malcolm White, Executive Director of the Mississippi Arts Commission, said,

“The artists who will perform and be recognized represent the very best of Mississippi, our story and the goodness of our diverse and curious history. Mississippi’s rightful real estate in the American musical landscape is firmly anchored in gospel and country as well blues, rock, jazz and pop music. Every night is Mississippi Night in the wide, wide world of American Music.”

Mac McAnnally –

Chart-topping recording artist, accomplished producer, hit songwriter and studio owner Mac McAnally marked another note in history with a record-breaking eight consecutive wins as the Country Music Association’s Musician of the Year in 2015.  McAnally was first honored with the Musician of the Year award in 2008, and has won every year since.  Beyond being one of the most respected guitar players and vocalists in Nashville, he has also been nominated for a CMA Award as an artist.

A.K.A. Nobody is McAnally’s latest solo album, sung, performed and produced by the much beloved session ace.  All but one of its songs were written by McAnally, either on his own or with illustrious co-writers including Jimmy Buffett, Kenny Chesney, Zac Brown, Sonny Landreth, Chris Stapleton, Al Anderson, and others.  Working with an all-star assembly of friends and studio colleagues, McAnally achieves a rare blend of deep soul and polished technique on each track.  The ironic tile notwithstanding, the music of A.K.A. Nobody speaks to everybody.

McAnally’s depth and breadth as an artist are no secret with the recording community.  McAnally grew up in Belmont, Mississippi and was raised on church choirs and formal lessons, playing pro gigs at 13, tutored on the mysteries of session excellence at the historic Muscle Shoals Studios and relocated to Nashville, he was an essential ingredient on studio dates with Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton George Strait, Lee Ann Womack, Randy Travis, George Jones, Billy Joel and many other headliners.  And with a track record that includes writing No. 1 hits on his own for Kenny Chesney (“Down the Road”) and Alabama (“Old Flame”) as well as penning chart-toppers for Sawyer Brown (“All These Years”) and Shenandoah (“Two Dozen Roses”), it’s no wonder that he has been voted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Sonny Landreth –

Born in Canton, Mississippi, Sonny grew up in Lafayette, Louisiana. The melding of those two places gave him the name “King of Slydeco” from his inimitable slide guitar technique together with southwest Louisiana influences of zydeco. He has enjoyed a prolific career for decades as a solo artist, celebrated sideman and session player. Over the years he performed and recorded with artists that include British blues innovator John Mayall and toured as a member of Jimmy Buffett’s band as well.

Landreth’s latest album Bound by the Blues was released in 2015. Vintage Guitar magazine said, “Landreth is arguably the finest living slide-guitar player on the planet.” The instrumental “Firebird Blues” from that album was created for his hero and fellow guitar ace Johnny Winter, who also grew up in Mississippi.

As Landreth said, “It’s always been about getting out on the road and playing these songs anyway. For me, it’s a continuum of that, with the songwriting process, going in to record and taking that out on the road. That’s still a familiar format for me, although a lot of the other moving parts have changed. As long as it’s soulful and I can get the message out there, I’m in.”

Muddy Magnolias –

the soulful duo of Kallie North and Jessy Wilson, are fresh on the music scene after meeting in Nashville just three years ago. Within six months of individually landing in Music City, North and Wilson met, became songwriting partners and bandmates. Before releasing a single, Muddy Magnolias had earned rave reviews from national press.  Rolling Stone praised, “a sound that melds city grit and Delta dirt, exploding onstage not like two lead singers but more like parts of the same whole…performed as if Mick Jagger and Keith Richards inhabited the Indigo Girls.”  They also landed a coveted spot in Elle magazine’s 2015 Women in Music issue. Now, with new music produced by Butch Walker (Weezer, Pink, Panic! At The Disco, Fall Out Boy) the pair are poised for their real breakthrough.

About GRAMMY Museum Mississippi

Built and operated by the Cleveland Music Foundation —

a non-profit organization developed in 2011 — the 28,000-square-foot GRAMMY Museum Mississippi will be housed near the campus of Delta State University, home of the Delta Music Institute’s Entertainment Industry Studies program, which features the most unique audio recording facilities in the South. Similar to its sister Museum — the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. LIVE — GRAMMY Museum Mississippi will be dedicated to exploring the past, present and future of music, and the cultural context from which it emerges, while casting a focused spotlight on the deep musical roots of Mississippi. The Museum will feature a dynamic combination of public events, educational programming, engaging multimedia presentations, and interactive permanent and traveling exhibits, including a Mississippi-centric display that will introduce visitors to the impact of Mississippi’s songwriters, producers and musicians on the traditional and modern music landscape. The Mississippi Museum’s debut special exhibit will be Ladies and Gentlemen…The Beatles! Curated by the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. LIVE and Fab Four Exhibits, Ladies and Gentlemen…The Beatles! provides fresh new insight into how and why The Beatles impacted America in the 1960s — and beyond.

For more information on about GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, visit www.grammymuseumms.org. For breaking news and exclusive content, follow @GRAMMYMuseumMS on Twitter and Instagram, and like “GRAMMY Museum Mississippi” on Facebook.

Photos courtesy of the GRAMMY Museum® Mississippi

Ocean Springs – The City of Discovery

 

Part 1

Ocean Springs, Mississippi

If you’ve ever been to this quaint little Gulf Coast town tucked along the eastern shore of Biloxi Bay then you know it has a lot to offer. Visitors come from far and wide, and many will either decide to stay and never return back home, relocate there, or decide to make it their retirement place.  Every town has its own personality, and this one lives and breathes a unique atmosphere, perhaps because of its nearness to New Orleans or its eccentric arts past.

A city that is increasingly growing in diversity, nestled within its space are lots of quirky boutiques, little shops, and great food places (more than 100!). A new favorite spot can be found around every corner. Ancient oak trees line many of the streets, stretching across the road and whispering tales of long ago. It’s a town with its own character, and a love for the arts. Numerous art festivals draw people from all over the US and Canada throughout the year, the most well-known being the Peter Anderson Festival.

Here is a baker’s dozen of popular favorites that you should not miss when you visit The City of Discovery:

  1. Tato-Nuts Donuts: The Mohler family has been making the world’s BEST donuts here since 1960. Donuts are made fresh every day, and you can also get a great cup of java (a.k.a coffee) and other pastries. These donuts are special because they’re made from potato flour- which kind of makes them healthier…at least that’s what I tell myself! Go early because there’s usually a line out the door! And if you go during the Mardi Gras season (Feb/March), be sure to try the King Cake donut. But the classic chocolate glazed is a popular favorite, especially because they make their chocolate glaze from scratch.

  2. Government Street Grocery: The best hamburger that you will seriously ever eat can be found at this restaurant. It’s not fancy, and it’s small but you can’t go wrong with any of the menu selections. Get the home-made fries and see if you can guess the secret ingredient. Be sure to look for their famous wall sign that reads, “Keep OS weird!” If you go in the evening, you can catch some great local bands (Texas Pete & Rooster Blues are just two examples). Local craft beers, like Blue Moon, are here, too.

  3. The new indie book shop, Southern Bound Book Shop: Finally, OS has an indie book shop! Bring on the 21st century! In its early stages before becoming a full-fledged butterfly, it’s currently tucked inside a cozy corner of the Adele & Grace Consignment Boutique…which is just mere footsteps from Gov’t Street Grocery. Events like Story Time for kids and a Book Club are encouraging folks to read more. They have a second location in Biloxi, and are great supporters of the local writers in the area. Many books written by local authors can be found here, as well as lots of new releases. Be sure to sign up for the rewards program to earn points for purchases toward future books. Go indies! Shop local!

  4. The Mary C. – officially the Mary C. O’Keefe Cultural Center for Arts and Education: If you want to catch a small theatre production or music venue, this is the place. Their annual calendar is filled each year with great artists and all good things for art lovers. This place is a nerve center for local arts. There’s a revolving art gallery that always features thought-provoking artwork or photography that very much pertains to local history and all things Southern. If you go, be sure to visit the gift shop for local designs and artwork. Don’t miss the Ocean Springs History Museum upstairs; if you can catch the Curator, he will tell you some very interesting things about the history of this place and how it developed, as well as the people who played roles in its development. The Mary C. always has a great many things going on. Besides all of these things already mentioned, it offers a wide variety of art classes for all ages… everything from calligraphy, sewing, painting, sculpture, and stained glass to drawing, jewelry making to culinary arts. Once a month they also offer a Saturday market on their lawn; local arts and crafts vendors set up stands and sell their wares.

  5. Walter Anderson Museum of Art: Ah, Walter Anderson…the eccentric man for which this town is famously known. His artwork is famously unique with flowing lines, ink drawings, wood carvings, and jewel-like watercolors. Most of his art relates heavily to the local area and its forms found in nature, such as the sea and local birds or fish. He was known for his 14-mile rowboat trips to Horn Island where he would spend weeks painting and becoming one with the sea and its creatures. If you visit the museum, you will find a unique collection of pieces that will inspire you to enter a magical world of imagination. And best of all, there is a huge room at the museum, tucked in the corner and used for meetings or gatherings; in this room you will find every inch of space filled with nature scenes and whimsical creatures or designs. There is also a Little Room, as it is known. It was discovered at his cottage after his death, and is a giant mural inspired by Psalm 104. The Little Room has been added as an extension to the museum, and stepping inside of it womb is like stepping into a magical and whimsical world filled with dreamlike imagination.

  6. Lovelace Drugstore & Soda Fountain: Nostalgia owns this place. It was originally the medical practice of Dr. O.L. Bailey, but was burned in 1915. It was rebuilt as Ocean Springs Drugs in 1926, and became Lovelace Drugs in the 1950’s. Still dressed in its retro-ish 50’s décor, Lovelace Drugs will take you back to yesteryear. It’s a must on your list of sites to see. They even still have the original soda fountain counter with bar stools. They still sell a small selection of typical drugstore items, but grilled Reuben’s are their specialty, along with milkshakes and root beer floats. A visit here is especially nostalgic during Cruzin’ on the Coast, when vintage vehicles take over the town.

  7. THE BEACH! – No stop to O.S. would be sufficient without a jaunt to the beach. There are a couple of popular spots. If you have a boat, you may want to check out the marina. Front Beach is conveniently located across from Fort Maurepas, which has playing areas for the kids and picnic tables, grills, and restrooms for the whole family. If you have your walking shoes, you can walk along a nicely paved sidewalk along the shore, and can even walk all the way to the Biloxi Bay Bridge which connects O.S. and Biloxi via highway 90. But East Beach is a personal favorite because it’s much quieter, and also allows dogs. This is also the best spot to watch fireworks on the 4th of July. No matter which spot in the sand you choose, watch for shrimp boats heading toward deeper waters, crabs along the beach, and pelicans diving for fish. If you linger to watch the sunsets, you’ll see a glorious show of colors and may catch fish jumping in the water. Breathe in the salt air, wiggle your toes, and relax…then write your name in the sand and get in touch with your inner child!

  8. Shearwater Pottery: Every town must have an off-the-beaten path place to check out. The first time that I went here, I seriously thought that I was headed to the boonies and would surely get lost in the woods and trampled by wild beavers or would end up driving headfirst into the ocean. Just past the marina, there’s a tiny, narrow dirt road- if you blink then you’ll miss it. There is a sign, but it blends in with the camouflage of the green bushes and clay road. Once you find this road, which is very narrow and curvy I might add, you pass several artist cabins before reaching a final cabin. You’ll know this is the place because of all the cars parked outside. Only in the South do we have driving directions like this! On any account, once inside you’ll be transported into another world…the world of marvelous pottery. Originally founded by Peter Anderson (brother of Walter) in 1928, it is still family-owned today. Needless to say, this is considered local hallowed ground. All three Anderson brothers- Peter, Walter, and James- are its most well-known pottery designers. Today they have a variety of potters who design and sell ceramics, decorative and utilitarian pieces as well as figurines. Truly unique in design and reasonably-priced, their pottery is magnificent. If you are into pottery and collections, this is one place you can’t miss. (Even if you’re not, just go!)

  9. French Kiss Pastries: Welcome to Paris! That’s exactly how you will feel upon entering this special little place. Take some time to ooh and aah over the beautiful and delectably inviting pastries, cakes, cookies and pies while you try to decide what to get. Personally, I always love their blueberry scones. The berries are so fresh that they explode in your mouth, bursting with flavor. But there’s also cute little gourmet cakes- get one and you can proudly claim that you ate a whole entire cake!

  10. Greenhouse on Porter: You will love this great little coffee shop that walks to the beat of its own drum. Jess & Katie, the owners, make the best gourmet biscuits this side of the Mason-Dixon Line. Housed in an actual former greenhouse, colorful artwork adorns the front entrance area, and the table seating area greets patrons with a small organic garden. There’s a special spot for parking your bicycle, and you’ll get treated like an old friend from the moment you step foot inside. They also host Opp Shop events for local artists, movie nights, musical afternoons, yoga, and writer’s table events. This is really a place that has quickly become embedded into the local community, and its positive vibe will infect you. Mondays are usually Free Coffee days, and be sure to visit the Little Free Library…it’s co-sponsored by Southern Bound Book Shop!

  11. Quakes Ice Creamery: From the outside, you would never know what a treasure can be found within the walls of this place! If you are a true adventurer, then you will take a chance and soon discover. Once inside, you can sit down and eat a great hamburger or hot dog and grab a homemade malt, ice cream or sundae specialty. The food is great, and the ice cream is the best and creamiest in town- and features daily flavor specials. But the best part of all is that you can write your name on the wall! Grab a sharpie, and find a spot if you can, and leave your mark. Folks have been doing this for years. Literally every inch is almost filled- walls, ceilings, tabletops, chairs and benches…even most of the bathroom spaces!

  12. Historic L & N Train Depot, and Fresh Market Saturdays: During the bustling train days of long ago, this station ran a line from Mobile to New Orleans, and it made stops in Ocean Springs. It was built in 1870, and has been lovingly renovated. Today it houses the Chamber of Commerce and a Visitor’s Center, as well as a small gift shop that features local artwork- particularly that of Walter Anderson. This is a great place to stop and get brochures and loot to plan your itinerary. On most Saturdays, depending on the season, you can check out the Fresh Market from 9am-noon. Local farmers bring their fresh crops, and you can also get local honey, fresh organic milk and eggs, cheese, beef jerky, handmade soaps, hand-spun yarn and a menagerie of other items.

  13. Belgicans Fries: Last but not least, this is really the BEST place to get fries. You can eat them for breakfast, lunch, or supper! The name is a blending of play on words, Belgium and America…it’s the Belgian and American way of eating fries. They have a second location a stone’s throw away in D’Iberville. Fresh-peeled potatoes are fried twice to a crispy golden and crunchy texture. When you order, you get to decide topping choices. The menu is diversely unique, and they really do make a meal.

As you can see from this list, Ocean Springs has a lot to offer visitors.

This list is just a short example. In a town with over 100 restaurants and loads of other great places, you will have no trouble finding great spots to shop, eat, or play. Plan your visit today!

The City of Discovery, Part I by Kristina Mullenix

 

Christmas on the Coast: Unique Holiday Traditions

Around the U.S. and even in Northern Mississippi,

folks are busy raking piles of autumn leaves of red and gold, harvesting fresh veggies for the winter coming soon, and getting their coats ready as the temperatures begin to get cooler each day. But not on the MS Gulf Coast! It’s an area of the country where it rarely gets cold enough this time of year to move things indoors. That’s great at Christmas-time, when the celebrations often stay outdoors, and where folks in that area love to be on the water. Living a life on the sea and according to the rhythms of the waves has been their way for many generations, after all. And that is one thing that’s especially unique about Christmas on the Coast. Life revolves around the sea and all of its bounty every day, and this includes the holidays.

Susan Dufek Gates, a native of the Coast, says that her family usually spends the summer and fall season catching fresh fish and seafood to prepare for the big family-get-together at Christmas. Then they all gather and have fried oysters, fried shrimp, and crab cakes for their holiday meal. She adds, “We just celebrate the holidays the way we grew up with them. Having seafood at Christmas is really an honoring and a celebration of our surroundings, granted by God, and living next to the water that provides our meals.”

“Food, family, and God”

are the way we Southerners live our lives, and Jesus is always the reason for the season. Quite a few Coastal families have started the tradition of baking birthday cakes for Jesus at Christmas. They gather with their loved ones around the Christmas tree and sing “Happy Birthday” before opening presents.

Most family gatherings revolve around food–

it’s the way people socialize and connect with one another, and everybody likes good food- no matter which state or country you are located. The Mississippi Gulf Coast is no different. “Come Christmastime, everyone makes their favorite dish or pasty, like pusharatas or lady fingers. Most of these recipes have been handed down from one generation to the next,” sometimes adding their own special secret ingredient…a dash of this and a little of that, and wah-la! That’s what Cynthia Baker Powell, who comes from a long line of seafaring folks on the Coast, tells us. She adds, “Of course, everyone thinks their version of the recipe is the best!” (FYI: Pusharatas are a traditional pastry from Croatia, from which many Slavonian families descend on the Coast. For those unaware, pusharatas are a type of deep-fried nugget that is filled with yummy things like chopped lemons, dates, oranges & spices such as cinnamon, and usually a splash (or two)of whiskey…. Learn more about how to make pusharatas here: http://www.southernfoodways.org/film/biloxi-croatian-pusharatas/)

The Coast would not be the Coast without boats…or a Boat Parade on the Water!

Just about all of the bigger coastal cities have their own boat parade, often accompanied by fireworks, face painting, vintage car shows, lots of food, downtown shopping events, and Santa (of course!). Many a generation ago somebody decided, “Hey, let’s decorate our boats for Christmas!” Moss Point, MS is the most famous for their boat parade, dubbed Christmas on the River. They even have costumed boaters throwing goodies and candies out to the kids. Everyone joins in the fun, watching the glittering lights cruise past on the harbor and taking in the sights of the festive decorations. Biloxi, Ocean Springs, and Gulfport follow suit, as does Bay St. Louis and Pascagoula.

If you want to kick up your season just a notch,

in the famous words of Louisiana’s native son Emeril Lagasse, then you might take a stroll through Lowe’s or Home Depot to pick up some alligator-shaped lights for Christmas. A few Coastal folks have been known to spice up their holiday season by hanging these beauties up around the house. You haven’t lived until you’ve sung Christmas Carols surrounded by the glow of Cajun gators beaming all around you. And more than a few tables can be found serving a hot plate of Alligator Meatballs or Gator-on-a-Stick!

Down Louisiana way, they are known for their tradition of “Bonfires on the Levee.”

Forget the simple flashing lights from a bulb on a string; the Cajuns prefer to light the way for Pere Noel (A.K.A. Santa Claus) by using 30-foot-high flaming bonfires! Can you say, “Gone pecan?”  Families gather and build the bonfires, often accompanied by music, a visit from Pere Noel, lots of food, and fireworks. Everyone has a grand evening on the eve before Christmas, and the tradition continues the following year.

  • “You’re never too young to learn the tradition of making lady fingers at Christmas.” (Pictured is Jason Powell)- Photo courtesy of Cynthia Baker Powell

The holiday season is a time of gathering together with loved ones.

No matter how you choose to celebrate the holidays, we hope you celebrate them surrounded by friends and family in the warm glow of love and many blessings. If you come to visit us here on the MS Coast, we’ll set an extra place for you at the table and warmly welcome you to our holiday gathering before we head out the door to the boat parade or the Bonfire on the Levee…but only after we’ve eaten a handful of grandma’s famous pusharatas and fresh seafood! Merry Christmas, y’all!

By: Kristina Mullenix

 

Southern Bound to Reading

What is a book shop?

Is it just a place to buy books or to take your old books for store credit? Independent book shops stretch far beyond this box, if they are true to their purpose and nature; for they are meant to be a hub of ideas, discussions, imagination and thinking, nerve centers of the community regarding literature and ideas, and encouragement toward literacy and reading. Every community should have an indie book shop.

Our community is blessed to have an indie book shop in Biloxi, MS.

Since 2013, Southern Bound Book Shop has been the only indie book shop in Biloxi (and also Ocean Springs). Shereen Markowitz Kostmayer dreamed of opening a community book shop and after 17 years in her chosen profession and a personal tragedy three years ago, she took her life into a different direction – to create space for real books to thrive in a digital world.

The book shop opened with nearly empty shelves, but it quickly grew and now spills over with books. In fact, a second location will soon open as the only book shop in Ocean Springs, Miss.

The Mississippi Gulf Coast is filled with talented writers and authors.

From the ocean, words seem to drip upon the shores and hang from the palm trees, inspiring the many who write. It’s a place known for artists, creativity and writers. Southern Bound Book Shop features the work of local and regional authors, from the well-known like Greg Iles and Carolyn Haines to the new and novice authors. Regional authors frequently visit the book shop to host Book Signings, readings, and receptions sometimes coined as “Wine & Signs.”

Southern Bound Book Shop has many loyal customers who order books and frequently stop by to peruse the menagerie of genres lining the bookshelves in the cozy boutique atmosphere. It’s the kind of place that overwhelms your desire to pull up a chair, grab a cup of coffee and read all day. You can also chat with Shereen about books as you meet new and interesting  people. In the children’s area is a reading rug and bean bag for the kiddos; in the back of the shop, Mom & Dad can plop into one of the funky and cushioned chairs.

The book shop also carries a large collection of used books,

many of which come from patrons who receive a store credit. The used books are in such great condition, one never guesses that most are used. Prices are reasonable and when in doubt about which book to choose, Shereen is happy to recommend one or two.

In addition to books, Southern Bound Book Shop offers vintage jewelry and recycled art by local artists. There is a small collectible books section for the true book collectors. Don’t forget to check out the Okra Picks Books, which are nominated by the Southern Independent Bookstores Alliance (SIBA). Members of SIBA nominate new books quarterly. Their motto is “Great Southern books, fresh off the vine.” Trisha Yearwood’s cookbook has been nominated, as well as many other great books for all ages.

Every Tuesday is New Release Day.

Lucy (from the “I Love Lucy” show) has become the unofficial mascot of New Release Day, and her image – a face of surprise and wonder- announces what new books have been released.

Southern Bound Book Shop encourages the community to read

by sponsoring a Little Free Library located at The Greenhouse on Porter in Ocean Springs, which has gotten great feedback from visitors who take a book and leave a book. This past summer, Southern Bound held several story time events for children.  They also offered a free activity for children at the Downtown Ocean Springs Artwalk at which kids could draw, write and make their own book to take home. Other recent events relate to local history, container gardening, and a benefit concert.

This corner book shop is truly a treasure for the community! Stop by and check it out… and bring a friend!

Southern Bound Book Shop
280 Eisenhower Drive (Biloxi, MS) in the Hobby Lobby Shopping Center
(second location coming soon to Ocean Springs, MS)

Visit Webpage

Visit Facebook:

Instagram & Twitter @ReadLocalBiloxi

By Kristina Mullenix

Columbus, Mississippi – Home of Tennessee

The 14th Annual Tennessee Williams Tribute & Tour of Victorian Homes

will take place from September 6-13, 2015 and pays tribute to one of the most important playwrights in American history, Tennessee Williams who was born in Columbus. Many of the struggles in Williams’ own life show are portrayed in A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and The Glass Menagerie.  He was awarded The Pulitzer Prize for Drama for A Streetcar Named Desire in 1948 and to Cat on a Hot Tin Roof in 1955, both of which were successful as films.

This annual event celebrates the life and work of Mr. Williams. During the festival week, attendees will enjoy special performances, educational presentations, and a 5k race.

 

COOL PLACES TO STAY IN COLUMBUS:

 

LOCAL RESTAURANT FAVORITES:

 

THINGS TO DO:

VISIT COLUMBUS

Corinth: Mississippi’s Gateway City

 

“Corinth holds a place in history, but history is only half our story.”

Located in the northeast corner of  the state, Corinth is often referred to as Mississippi’s Gateway City. Southern Roots caught up with Christy Burns, Executive Director with Corinth Area Convention & Visitors Bureau, to find out more about the other half of the story.

“Although our town is rich in Civil War history, we have so much more to offer our visitors,” said Christy. “Our Downtown is an attraction in itself.  We are blessed with many locally owned restaurants and boutique shops that can make any visit worth the time.”

For those with only a few hours to spare, Christy suggests stopping off at the Civil War Interpretive Center.

“The center is a 10 million dollar facility that takes you through how the railroad crossing in Corinth played such a pivotal role in the battle,” she said. “It also talks about the Contraband Camp where freed slaves came to learn skills to equip them to be successful in their new found freedom.”

Plan your few hours in Corinth around lunchtime because dining at any one local spot is a must to enjoy Corinth’s rich culinary offerings.

An overnight trip can start off the the Civil War Interpretive Center, Christy explained. “I would then suggest the Crossroads Museum that is located downtown along with a stroll through our Art Gallery.”

Another “must see” for the entire family is Borroums in Downtown Corinth, the oldest drug store in the state. Borroums is the stop for everything from a slugburger , to cornbread salad or just a milkshake. Former CSA army surgeon A.J. Borroum founded the drugstore in 1865.  It also houses Native American artifact, Civil War relics, and an authentic, working soda fountain.  This business has been owned and operated by the Borroum family since its founding. Another longtime family business is Biggers Hardware, which opened 1918. Its ownership is in the fourth generation of the Biggers family.

If you decide to stay over on a Thursday, Pickin’ on the Square begins at six that night. “People bring lawn chairs or sit on the courthouse steps to listen to local musicians playing bluegrass music.”

The entire year in Corinth is filled with festivals with summer kicking off with the Slugburger Festival. Then, the Alcorn County Fair runs from Tuesday through Saturday every September.

“Hog Wild is a BBQ cooking contest and festival combined into the first weekend of October,” said Christy. “ Changing things up to make our festivals more of a regional pull is what we are trying to do.”

And Corinth has accomplished that with the Slugburger Festival adding the MLE sanctioned Slugburger Eating Contest, which happens the weekend after the MLE Nathan’s hot dog eating contest.

“We get national coverage when they talk about the MLE eaters coming to have a slugburger.”

New art exhibits are on display monthly at the Corinth Artist Guild Gallery.  Every year, the Corinth Symphony Orchestra performs five concerts.  The Crossroads Arena hosts a variety of entertainment events and big-name entertainers.  Art exhibits and educational programs are held at the Corinth Library. The Crossroad Museum, through permanent and traveling exhibits, tells the story of Corinth’s past.  The Corinth Theatre-Arts season offers a variety of productions and readings.

Corinthians never meet a stranger, so when you visit Corinth, you may arrive a visitor, said Christy, but you leave a friend.

For more information, go to our website or download our free app, “Visit Corinth” from your smartphone app store.

 

  • Photo Courtesy of Visit Corinth

CORINTH FACTOID:

Ninety years ago (July, 1924) the palatial, multi-purpose Coliseum Theater celebrated its opening in downtown Corinth. The Coliseum has been and remains today the most monumental theatre space in Corinth, Mississippi and the surrounding area. Built in 1924 by self-styled architect, Benjamin Franklin Liddon, the Coliseum has long been integral to the cultural development of Northeast Mississippi as well as being architecturally significant in its city and state: in the City, as a major congregation space and physical reminder of the richness of the City and County’s past; and in the state, as a breed of shelters for culture built in a day when concern for quality was manifested in people’s reverence of the arts. In its life the Coliseum has served a variety of purposes.

VISIT CORINTH:

Corinth Theatre

Crossroads Arena

Corinth Green Market

Magnolia Car Club