A GARDEN, A LIFE

“A garden is only yours as long as you seed, weed, cultivate, water and prune. A garden needs lots of tender loving care. It’s lots of work, softening the soil with hoeing and fertilizing, planting and watering… Protect the seeds from vermin. Prune when things grow too fast and wild… the whole point, don’t you see? Bearing fruit and carrying the sweet aroma.” –Francine Rivers, “Leota’s Garden”

On sunny spring days, garden stores are overflowing with ladies poking around among the bedding plants and planning their gardens. I’m not much of a gardener, but I’m right there with those ladies buying ferns and geraniums and potting soil, and I do need some zinnia seeds too.

I’m always inspired by other people’s pretty flower gardens.

I’m thinking of a front yard in one of the older neighborhoods, where a profusion of color peeps out through a white picket fence. The unique personality of the garden derives from the owner’s careful arrangement of healthy plants intermingled with quaint one-of-a-kind objects. I don’t think she ever planned the décor, but it developed as she collected things that called to her–a sale on bedding plants at a garden store, a display of hand-crafted birdhouses at a flea market, a collection of hand-painted feeders. The thing that holds it all together is the work the gardener continually puts into her space—planting, watering, feeding, weeding, and protecting her plants from vermin.

A life can be like a garden.

Each life is different. Some are well-tended and skillfully grown. Some are mediocre and plain, and others are scraggly and neglected. Some thrive and grow and bear good fruit.

Proverbs says,

“He who cultivates his garden will have plenty of bread.” I think God is saying: “I planted you at a particular spot. Look around; what do you see? There’s raw material waiting for your cultivation. If you do your work, you’ll have everything you need. You’ll begin to bear fruit right there in your particular space, and you’ll have more than you need—you’ll have enough to share with a hungry world.”

The Amplified Bible warns,

“But he who follows worthless people and pursuits will have poverty enough” (Proverbs 28:19). Our eyes wander to the neighbor’s garden. We watch others and think we’re supposed to be like them and have what they have. While we stand there wishing for someone else’s flowers and fruit, our work stops and our own plot becomes over-grown with weeds.

In the Message Bible, Galatians 6 instructs:

“Live creatively… Make a careful exploration of who you are and the work you have been given and sink yourself into that. Don’t compare yourself with others. Each of you must take responsibility for doing the creative best you can with your own life.”

It’s hard work making the most of your life. It’s not always fun when you’re digging. You pray for sun and sometimes it wilts your plants. You wake up one morning and something invisible seems to have invaded and drained the life out of your petunias. That’s when you look over the fence at what the neighbors have and wonder what’s wrong with you. It hurts when God prunes away what you’ve worked so hard for.

Nevertheless, one morning there’s a tiny green sprout peeping out of the soil and you know that God is still in control of growing things in your garden. So just keep watering and weeding and trusting Him. Something will grow and bloom and bear good fruit.

Robert Louis Stevenson said:

“To be what we are and to become what we are capable of becoming is the only end of life.”

 by Virginia Dawkins
Image courtesy of worradmu at FreeDigitalPhotos.net