The “People” Problem with Pets

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The Hub City Humane Society began as an idea on a laptop in the back office

of a Veterinarian’s clinic in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Now, it provides compassionate care to the thousands of homeless, neglected and abused animals in the area. Hub City Director Virginia Cheatham began volunteering at a local shelter over 17 years ago and has saved many animals from shelters and fostered animals needing a temporary place to call home.

“We don’t have a pet problem,” said Virginia. “We have a people problem. Until everybody gets it and spays and neuters their pets in this country, millions of animals are going to die in shelters across this country every year.”

The Human Society of the United States chose Hub City to be a part of the “End the Puppy Mill” campaign. In 2015, Hub City took in over 3,000 animals. In the spring and summer, Hub can get up to 100 pets a week, said Virginia.

“We are an open admission animal shelter servicing Lamar County and the City of Petal. We engage the public awareness of animal welfare issues, as well as work to prevent cruelty and promote kindness towards animals.”

Hub City collaborates with rescues and animal welfare organizations both locally and nationally

and maintains the highest level of performance through continued training and education for management and staff. Areas Hub City would like to add to the shelter are an equestrian area and after-school programs. Its mission is to provide the best care for the magnitude of homeless and unwanted pets in the community and to transport them to northeast areas with a 100% percent adoption rate.

“The majority of the dogs we move here go to transport in the Northeast,” said Virginia.

Transports go to the state of Philadelphia where a chain of Pets Plus stores adopt the dogs out of those locations.

“We have a 100% adoption rate,” said Virginia. “We also send [the dogs] to Avon, Connecticut, which takes the older and larger dogs that are extremely hard to move, and they are placed in the most perfect homes.”

All animals going to transport have to be current on everything, explained Virginia. “They have to have health exams and their microchip numbers have to correlate with paperwork.” Hub City usually does two transports in one day, which can amount to 40 or more dogs.

“We have two other places that want to contract with us, one in Atlanta and the other in New York.”

Being a non-profit, funding is crucial to the Shelter, which currently receives money from Lamar County and holds a contract for the city limits of Petal.

“We take in their animal control animals and the citizens in Petal are able to bring their animals to this facility.”

Animal overpopulation is so rampant in the Hattiesburg area, there is no way for every animal entering a shelter to leave it. Hub City is open admission, which means it takes in everything, no matter the age, health, temperament, and condition of the dog.

“We are the little shelter that could. Everything we have here has been donated, except for the transport van and computer,” said Virginia. “Community support has been fantastic. We are very close to starting fundraising for a building out here.”

Volunteers are always needed at Hub City in every area,

including the thrift store and bringing in fresh, new fundraising ideas. Still, Virginia says the best thing the community can do for Hub City Humane Society is to be responsible for their pets, microchip them, ID them, and if their pet becomes lost, to look for it. More importantly, spay and neuter your pets.

BREAKOUT BOX:

Hub City Humane Society
95 Jackson Rd
Hattiesburg, MS 39402
Phone: 601-596-2206
Fax: 601-255-5391
Email: hubcityhumsoc@aol.com

By Richelle Putnam

Feature first published in Parents & Kids Magazine – Pine Belt

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